CUT OFF PERENNIALS FOR SECOND BLOOM

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CUT OFF PERENNIALS FOR SECOND BLOOM

 

The plants that flower first in your garden often have finished flowering relatively quickly. When the majority of border plants then start to flower, the early varieties are already on their way back and they often start to look a bit withered.

If you cut those early perennials back to a few centimeters above the ground, they will soon be fresh and fruity again and often flower again later in the season. Because the plants are quickly back in the leaf, the overall border image is also more beautiful. It is best to cut it off in some dark growing weather. At high temperatures and drought, the heart of the plant has to endure extra.

CUT BACK SPECIES

In principle, all perennials that flower before the longest day (June 21) can be cut back. If you do it in time (before the beginning of July), a limited second bloom is possible. If you do it later, the plant will become more beautiful and vital, but it will not really bloom anymore.

  • Salvia (sage) early flowering species.
  • Alchemilla mollis (lady’s mantle)
  • Nepeta (catnip) only the short-flowering varieties.
  • Coreopsis (girls eyes)
  • Delphinium (larkspur) you can also limit yourself to the flowers
  • Geranium Rozanne (cranesbill) more for balance.
  • Geranium cinereum (cranesbill)
  • Campanula (bellbell) (early species only)
  • Lupine
  • Trollius

Tip:
It is advisable not to put too large numbers of the same early bloomers together. You will then get a (temporary) haircut by cutting back that is not nice to see.

CLIPPING FOR BETTER TILLING AND BALANCE

When sowing wild flower mixtures and nowadays also sown perennials and perennials on sod (see Bloomingfields ) it can happen that certain varieties are stronger in the beginning and give the weaker growing varieties less chance to develop. In such a case it is better during the first year to completely cut the border (mow) to 20 cm. The sooner the better! It’s a shame about the already exuberant flowering plants. But within 3 weeks the flowering is completely back and the less exuberant varieties also get a chance to participate.

Then there is also the situation that certain plants in a border are just a bit too high for a nicely balanced image. These are often the grasses. By taking these high ‘boys’ back a bit during growing up, they will no longer become so high and you restore the balance. It is of course best to choose a plant that does not grow too high by nature.
The cut-back method is often also used at large flower shows and festivals.

For more information, see:

  • Perennials
  • Pruning rules per plant group
  • maintenance

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